Detecting DNA in Space

Chris Carr and the team from MIT are preparing to launch a payload to sample the stratosphere on the High Altitude Student Platform next month.  It’s great to meet fellow microbiologist looking for high altitude samples.

anunnaki,alien gods and spirituality

 

If there is life on Mars, it’s not too farfetched to believe that such Martian species may share genetic roots with life on Earth. 

Detecting DNA in space
Mars [Credit: NASA]

More than 3.5 billion years ago, a blitz of meteors ricocheted around the solar system, passing material between the two fledgling planets. This galactic game of pingpong may have left bits of Earth on Mars, and vice versa, creating a shared genetic ancestry between the two planets.

Such a theory holds great appeal for Christopher Carr, a research scientist in MIT’s Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences. Working with Gary Ruvkun at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Maria Zuber, the E.A. Griswold Professor of Geophysics and MIT’s vice president for research, Carr is building a DNA sequencer that he hopes will one day be sent to Mars, where it can analyze soil and ice samples for traces of DNA and other…

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